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Repetitive strain injuries.

Lancet 1997 March 30
Repetitive strain injuries (RSI) present an increasingly common challenge to clinicians. They consist of variety of musculoskeletal disorders, generally related to tendons, muscles, or joints, as well as some common peripheral-nerve-entrapment and vascular syndromes. These disorders generally affect the back, neck, and upper limbs, although lower limbs may also be involved. Although RSI may occur as a result of sports and recreational activities, occupational RSIs, affecting the patient's livelihood, are particularly important. These injuries result from repetitive and forceful motions, awkward postures, and other work-related conditions and ergonomic hazards. Occupationally induced RSIs are generally costly, creating a strong incentive for physicians to become familiar with the symptoms, signs, and risk factors so that they can be diagnosed early and appropriate interventions facilitated.

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