CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Short-term electrical stimulation enhances the effectiveness of Botulinum toxin in the treatment of lower limb spasticity in hemiparetic patients.

Neuroscience Letters 1995 December 2
The study tested the spasmolytic effect of Botulinum toxin A in two groups of hemiparetic patients with lower limb spasticity: in the first group (n = 5) 2000 U Dysport were injected into the soleus, tibialis posterior and both heads of gastrocnemius muscles alone; the second (n = 5) received additional repetitive alternating electrical stimulation of M. tibialis anterior and plantar flexors for 30 min six times per day during the 3 days following the injection. Muscle tone, rated by the Ashworth spasticity score, and gait analysis including recording of vertical ground reaction forces, were assessed before and 4 weeks after injection. The combined treatment proved to be more effective with respect to the clinically assessed reduction of muscle tone, gait velocity, stride length, stance- and swing-symmetry (P < 0.05). The result is discussed with reference to animal experiments demonstrating enhanced toxin uptake and accelerated onset of its paralytic effect by electrical stimulation.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app