Comparative Study
Journal Article
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Effects of mild, moderate and severe exercise on intraocular pressure of sedentary subjects.

Previous studies have shown a reduction in intraocular pressure (IOP) from many forms of exertion, ranging from walking to exhausting exercise. The variability in these results may be due to several factors, such as age, diurnal and seasonal variations, drinking water or coffee before the test, acute hyperglycaemia, and physical fitness. The purpose of the study was to investigate the effects of the common means of exertion on IOP in the same subject, after elimination of above-mentioned factors. The effects of sitting, walking, jogging, and running fast till exhaustion were noted on the IOP of 15 healthy sedentary male volunteers at an interval of 4 days. Intraocular pressures were measured with a Goldmann applanation tonometer at the beginning and at 5th, 20th, 40th, and 60th minutes of the first three tests, but in test 4, only at the beginning and end. Post-exercise measurements were taken after every 10 minutes until IOP returned to pre-exercise levels. The effects of all tests were similar on both eyes. During sitting, walking and jogging, the maximum decreases were (mean +/- SD) 1.20 +/- 0.66, 3.20 +/- 1.19, and 5.07 +/- 1.76 mmHg, and occurred at the 20th, 40th and 60th minutes of the tests respectively. During sitting, walking and jogging, 66.7%, 75% and 68.4% of the maximum decreases occurred after 5 min respectively. After running the mean decrease was 5.7 +/- 1.09 mmHg and the average time of running was 10.53 +/- 2.17 min. In the sitting test, recovery occurred at the end of the test, while in walking, jogging and running tests it occurred after 12.67 +/- 44.48, 30.67 +/- 7.99, and 56.00 +/- 11.21 min, respectively. It is concluded that all forms of exertion decrease IOP. It would seem reasonable, at present, not to discourage patients who have glaucoma from walking; perhaps, on the contrary, it should be encouraged.

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