Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Studies of autoantigens recognized by IgA anti-keratinocyte cell surface antibodies.

We have examined autoantigens for IgA anti-keratinocyte cell surface antibodies in 17 intercellular IgA vesiculopustular dermatosis (IAVPD) cases showing only IgA antibodies and 5 cases showing both IgG and IgA antibodies (G A cases). IAVPD cases were divided into two subtypes: (1) intraepidermal neutrophilic IgA dermatosis type showing pustule formation throughout the epidermis and IgA antibodies reactive with the entire epidermis and (2) subcorneal pustular dermatosis type containing IgA antibodies reactive with the uppermost portion of the epidermis. Most G A cases showed atypical clinical features. With immunoblot analysis of normal human epidermal extracts, IgA antibodies in these cases showed no specific reactivity with either pemphigus foliaceus antigen (desmoglein 1) or pemphigus vulgaris antigen (desmoglein 3), except that IgC antibodies in one G/A case each recognized one of the two antigens. With immunoblotting of desmosome enriched fraction obtained from bovine snout epidermis, IgA antibodies in 10 IAVPD and 3 G/A cases and IgG antibodies in 4 G/A cases showed reactivity with either desmoglein 1 or desmocollin another desmosomal cadherin. These results indicate that IAVPD and G/A cases are heterogeneous in terms of both clinical features and antigens and that the IgA autoantibodies in these cases may react with different antigens from those for IgG autoantibodies.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app