Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Atypical forms of paroxysmal positional nystagmus.

Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) is a common cause of vertigo, and has a typical constellation of physical findings. Atypical forms of paroxysmal positional nystagmus (APPN) also exist, and are thought to represent conditions which are in fact not "benign". We studied 100 consecutive patients with positional vertigo in order to learn whether APPN differed from classic BPPV in etiology or clinical fate, and to learn the incidence of central nervous system (CNS) disorders in these patients. APPN was present in 38% of these patients with diverse causes. One-fourth had CNS disorders or vascular insufficiency, the remainder, otogenic or idiopathic. APPN was more likely than BPPV to have a prolonged (persistent or recurring) clinical course. Although most cases eventually resolved, duration of symptoms tended to be longer, regardless of etiology. We conclude that APPN has a less favorable prognosis than typical BPPV, and that a CNS etiology should be suspected in prolonged cases.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app