RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Production of a model for Lesch-Nyhan syndrome in hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase-deficient mice.

Nature Genetics 1993 March
The inherited disease Lesch-Nyhan syndrome, which is caused by a deficiency of the enzyme hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), is characterized by behavioural alterations, including self-injurious behaviour and mental retardation. Although HPRT-deficient mice have been generated using the embryonic stem cell system, no spontaneous behavioural abnormalities had been reported. We examined whether mice were more tolerant of HPRT deficiency because they were more reliant on adenine phosphoribosyltransferase (APRT) than HPRT for their purine salvage. The administration of an APRT inhibitor to HPRT-deficient mice induced persistent self-injurious behaviour. This combined genetic and biochemical model will facilitate the study of Lesch-Nyhan syndrome and the evaluation of novel therapies.

Full text links

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Group 7SearchHeart failure treatmentPapersTopicsCollectionsEffects of Sodium-Glucose Cotransporter 2 Inhibitors for the Treatment of Patients With Heart Failure Importance: Only 1 class of glucose-lowering agents-sodium-glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitors-has been reported to decrease the risk of cardiovascular events primarily by reducingSeptember 1, 2017: JAMA CardiologyAssociations of albuminuria in patients with chronic heart failure: findings in the ALiskiren Observation of heart Failure Treatment study.CONCLUSIONS: Increased UACR is common in patients with heart failure, including non-diabetics. Urinary albumin creatininineJul, 2011: European Journal of Heart FailureRandomized Controlled TrialEffects of Liraglutide on Clinical Stability Among Patients With Advanced Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Review

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Read by QxMD is copyright © 2021 QxMD Software Inc. All rights reserved. By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app