Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Biochemical pathogenesis of subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord and brain.

In humans, subacute combined degeneration of the spinal cord and brain, a primary demyelinating disease, is caused by cobalamin or methyltetrahydrofolate deficiency. Experimental studies into its pathogenesis suggest that dysfunction of the methyl-transfer pathway may be the cause. Compelling evidence for this comes from the study of inborn errors of cobalamin metabolism where deficiency of methylcobalamin, but not deoxyadenosylcobalamin, is associated with demyelination. Recent studies have focused upon inborn errors of the methyl-transfer pathway. Cerebrospinal fluid concentrations of metabolites of the methyl-transfer pathway have been measured in humans with sequential errors of the pathway and correlated with demyelination demonstrated on magnetic resonance imaging of the brain. This has provided new data suggesting that deficiency of S-adenosylmethionine is critical to the development of demyelination in cobalamin deficiency.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app