JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
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The epidemiology of heart failure: the Framingham Study.

Congestive heart failure has become an increasingly frequent reason for hospital admission during the last 2 decades and clearly represents a major health problem. Data from the Framingham Heart Study indicate that the incidence of congestive heart failure increases with age and is higher in men than in women. Hypertension and coronary heart disease are the two most common conditions predating its onset. Diabetes mellitus and electrocardiographic left ventricular hypertrophy are also associated with an increased risk of heart failure. During the 1980s, the annual age-adjusted incidence of congestive heart failure among persons aged > or = 45 years was 7.2 cases/1,000 in men and 4.7 cases/1,000 in women, whereas the age-adjusted prevalence of overt heart failure was 24/1,000 in men and 25/1,000 in women. Despite improved treatments for ischemic heart disease and hypertension, the age-adjusted incidence of heart failure has declined by only 11%/calendar decade in men and by 17%/calendar decade in women during a 40-year period of observation. In addition, congestive heart failure remains highly lethal, with a median survival time of 1.7 years in men and 3.2 years in women and a 5-year survival rate of 25% in men and 38% in women.

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