Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Infection and antibiotic therapy in 4000 burned patients treated in Milan, Italy, between 1976 and 1988.

Burns 1993 August
The pathogenic flora, isolated from burn wounds of patients admitted to a burn care unit during the years between 1976 and 1988 were typed and the in vitro susceptibility to antibacterial agents was recorded. Between 1976 and 1988 the general therapeutic approach was changed three times, in congruence with the prevalent nosocomial bacterial resistance. The most frequent isolates were: Pseud. aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus spp., Proteus mirabilis, Escherichia coli, Enterobacter cloacae, Klebsiella spp. and other Enterobacteriaceae, such as Acinetobacter, Citrobacter. The most striking finding was the increase in antibiotic-resistant Enterococcus isolates. Staph. aureus, Klebsiella and E. cloacae showed susceptibility to cephalosporins, imipenem, pefloxacin, vancomycin; Enterococcus susceptibility to pefloxacin and vancomycin, and Pseud. aeruginosa sensitivity to piperacillin, amikacin, tobramycin was generally good. E. coli showed a satisfactory susceptibility on average, and P. mirabilis showed a good sensitivity to piperacillin, cephalosporins, amikacin, tobramycin, aztreonam and imipenem. Thus, the general bacterial flora and susceptibility have remained mostly unchanged over the years, with the conspicuous exception of Enterococcus spp. and E. cloacae, which demonstrated a marked increase in incidence, with a concomitant dramatic decrease in the sensitivity of Enterococcus spp. to antibiotics.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app