JOURNAL ARTICLE

Physiological responses to specific maximal exercise tests for cross-country skiing

P B Watts, M D Hoffman, J E Sulentic, K M Drobish, T P Gibbons, V S Newbury, S W Mittelstadt, K P O'Hagan, P S Clifford
Canadian Journal of Applied Physiology, Revue Canadienne de Physiologie Appliquée 1993, 18 (4): 359-65
8275049
The present study attempted to quantify differences in peak physiological responses to pole-striding (PS), double poling on roller skis (DP), and diagonal striding on roller skis (DS) during maximal exercise. Six expert cross-country ski racers (3 M, 3 F) with a mean age of 20.2 +/- 1.3 yrs served as subjects. Testing was conducted on a motorized ski treadmill with a tracked belt surface. Expired air was analyzed continuously via an automated open-circuit system and averaged each 20 s. Heart rate was monitored via telemetry and arterialized blood was collected within 1 min of test termination and analyzed immediately for lactate. Peak values for heart rate and blood lactate did not differ among techniques. Peak oxygen uptake was higher for PS and DS versus DP whereas no difference was found between PS and DS. The VO2peak for DP was 77 and 81% of VO2peak for PS and DS, respectively. It was concluded that despite similar peak heart rate and blood lactate values, DP elicits a lower VO2peak than DS or PS and that PS responses appear to closely reflect those of DS.

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