JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Perinatal morbidity associated with violence experienced by pregnant women.

OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether physical assault is independently associated with an adverse obstetric outcome.

STUDY DESIGN: We compared the perinatal outcomes of 32 indigent women who reported being physically abused during pregnancy with those of 352 control subjects who denied ever being assaulted. Patients were classified into the appropriate category on the basis of a structured interview. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate the relative risk of adverse outcome while adjusting for confounders.

RESULTS: Women assaulted in the current pregnancy were twice as likely to have preterm labor as compared with those who denied assault. In addition, crude odds ratios showed a twofold increased risk of chorioamnionitis in assault victims. No difference between abused and nonabused women was noted in the prevalence of preterm delivery, pregnancy-induced hypertension, cesarean section, meconium staining, infant birth weight, Apgar scores, intrauterine growth retardation, fetal distress, fetal death, neonatal seizures, sepsis, or admission to the intensive care unit.

CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that physical assault during pregnancy is associated with preterm labor and chorioamnionitis. Screening for ongoing assault should be incorporated into routine prenatal care to identify women at risk of complications.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app