CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Effects of apraclonidine on intraocular pressure and blood-aqueous barrier permeability after phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation.

To evaluate the effect of topical apraclonidine on early postoperative intraocular pressure and blood-aqueous barrier permeability, we conducted a double-masked clinical trial in which 37 patients undergoing uncomplicated phacoemulsification and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation were randomly assigned to treatment with 1% apraclonidine or its vehicle. One drop of 1% apraclonidine or its vehicle was instilled 1/2 hour preoperatively and immediately postoperatively. In addition to intraocular pressure, aqueous flare intensity was also determined before and after the operation by using a laser flare-cell meter. In the apraclonidine group, intraocular pressure showed no significant postoperative increase, whereas it showed a significant increase at six hours in the vehicle group (P < .01). Difference between intraocular pressure recorded at the end of the operation with the Tono-Pen II and that measured postoperatively was significantly greater in the vehicle group by 3.5 to 7.0 mm Hg (P < .05 to .01). In the apraclonidine group, the aqueous flare intensity was about half that in the vehicle group with significant differences at six (P < .05) and 24 (P < .01) hours.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app