Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

The radiographic evaluation of the patient with esophageal carcinoma.

Barium swallow and endoscopy are complementary procedures in the detection of early esophageal carcinoma. CT is useful in the detection of distant metastases, and mediastinal invasion of key structures such as airway, aorta, and pericardium, but does not reliably differentiate T2 from T3 lesions or define subtle upper abdominal adenopathy. The disparity in reported results from different series published over the last 12 years can be accredited to two causes. First is the lack of uniformity in the way the studies were performed. Most authors agree that slice thickness should be 1 cm and contiguous. Lehr et al used 2-cm slices through the upper abdomen with additional slices through areas of special interest. Similarly, Markland defines his technique as "1-cm intervals from the thoracic inlet to the carina and below this at 1.5 cm intervals to the level of the adrenal glands." Such parameters are hardly optimized for the detection of 8-mm lymph nodes. The other cause of the disparity is interobserver variation in study interpretation. Goei et al staged 35 cases of esophageal cancer using CT. The CT interpretations of each of three readers were subsequently correlated with surgical and pathologic findings of 17 patients. CT pathologic correlation of the three observers showed sensitivities ranging from 50% to 57%, specificities ranging from 50% to 60%, and accuracies ranging from 46% to 71%. CT is useful as a surveillance tool in the postoperative patient. MR imaging does not have a defined role in the workup of esophageal tumors at this time.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app