CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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Mastoid oscillation: a critical factor for success in canalith repositioning procedure.

The canalith repositioning procedure has recently gained controversial recognition as a treatment for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. Some authors contend that the canalith repositioning maneuver is no more effective than no treatment at all. Unfortunately, its technique has not been uniformly applied and its outcomes have not been uniformly assessed. I have found the use of mastoid oscillation to be critical in the success of this procedure. Another important factor is the time interval between diagnosis and relief of symptoms. Because it is well known that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo can spontaneously resolve after many months, the time frame for comparison should be short. A 1-week time interval was chosen for study purposes. Sixty patients were randomly assigned to three initial groups. The control group (n = 23) was not given any treatment. A second group (n = 27) was given treatment with the canalith repositioning maneuver with mastoid vibration. A third group (n = 10) was assigned to receive the canalith repositioning maneuver without mastoid vibration. Resolution was defined as no symptoms and negative Dix-Hallpike test results. The results showed that none of the control group's symptoms resolved completely in 1 week. Although 60% of those who received the canalith repositioning maneuver without mastoid vibration felt improved, none was free of nystagmus. An overwhelming 92% of those who received the canalith repositioning maneuver with mastoid vibration felt improved, and 70% were free of rotatory nystagmus after only one treatment. A review of all patients diagnosed with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo and treated with the canalith repositioning maneuver with mastoid vibration was also undertaken. In a series of 67 patients with a minimum of four weeks of follow-up, only two have not responded to the canalith repositioning maneuver, yielding a 97% rate of symptom control.

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