Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical significance of right ventricular dilatation in patients with right ventricular infarction.

BACKGROUND: Right ventricular infarction can be accurately diagnosed by ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads. However, the clinical outcome of right ventricular infarction encompasses a wide spectrum, ranging from no hemodynamic compromise to cardiogenic shock. The present study examined the clinical significance of echocardiographic right ventricular dilatation in patients with right ventricular infarction.

METHODS: We studied 60 consecutive patients with ECG evidence of right ventricular infarction (at least 1 mm ST-segment elevation and QS or QR in V4R) after their first acute Q-wave inferior infarction. They had been admitted to the coronary care unit within 24 h of the onset of chest pain. The presence of right ventricular dilatation was diagnosed when the end-diastolic ratio between right and left ventricle was more than 0.5 on two-dimensional echocardiogram.

RESULTS: Of the 60 patients with ECG evidence of right ventricular infarction, 29 had right ventricular dilatation (group 1) and 31 did not (group 2). We used four clinical variables in multivariate analysis to determine the significant factors related to right ventricular infarction. Mean right atrial pressure and number of left ventricular segments with advanced asynergy were found to be the important factors. Furthermore, a significantly higher incidence of major complications (cardiogenic shock and need for temporary pacing) was observed in group 1 than in group 2. Right ventricular dilatation was found to be the significant factor related to major complications.

CONCLUSION: Echocardiographic right ventricular dilatation is an important non-invasive sign obtained on admission in patients with right ventricular infarction, because it is associated with larger left ventricular infarct size and increased risk of major complications.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app