Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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Relationship of symptoms of prostatism to commonly used physiological and anatomical measures of the severity of benign prostatic hyperplasia.

Journal of Urology 1993 August
In previous studies the severity of symptoms of prostatism in men with benign prostatic hyperplasia have not correlated well with prostate size, degree of bladder trabeculation, uroflowmetry or post-void residual volume. As part of a prospective cohort study of benign prostatic hyperplasia treatment effectiveness in 4 university-based urology practices, we correlated symptom severity and these commonly used measures of disease severity. Symptom severity was quantified using the American Urological Association symptom index. Analyses were based on 198 outpatients completing a standardized evaluation (84 of these men have completed 6 months of followup after treatment with prostatectomy, balloon dilation, terazosin or watchful waiting). At baseline, symptom severity was not correlated with uroflowmetry, post-void residual, prostate size and degree of bladder trabeculation. However, symptom severity was much more strongly related to overall health status than the other measures. Reduction in symptoms with treatment did correlate with improvements in uroflowmetry. This poor baseline correlation with symptoms may reflect unreliability in measurement of the physiological/anatomical variables. Alternatively, these parameters may be measuring different pathophysiological phenomena.

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