JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
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Unintentional carbon monoxide poisoning in Colorado, 1986 through 1991.

Unintentional carbon monoxide poisonings were identified through death certificates, by hyperbaric chambers, and by laboratories required to report carboxyhemoglobin levels greater than 12%. From 1986 to 1991, 981 cases were reported, including 174 deaths. Deaths most often resulted from fire-related carbon monoxide intoxication (36.2%), followed by motor vehicle exhaust (34.5%), and furnaces (10.3%). Among nonfatal cases, furnaces were the leading source of carbon monoxide exposure (44.3%), followed by motor vehicle exhaust (22.8%). The importance of furnaces and other home heating devices in carbon monoxide intoxication may be underappreciated if only mortality data are examined. Surveillance of carbon monoxide-related morbidity is a useful adjunct to mortality surveillance in guiding prevention efforts.

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