Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Antibiotic effects on bacterial viability, toxin production, and host response.

The efficacy of an antibiotic in human or experimental infection is presumed to be proportional to its in vitro antimicrobial activity, yet antibiotics having comparable in vitro activity may have markedly different efficacies in vivo. For example, we have reported that clindamycin is more efficacious than penicillin in experimental gas gangrene caused by Clostridium perfringens in animals. To explain these differences, we compared the dynamics of bacterial killing and suppression of toxin synthesis. In addition, we investigated the ability of clindamycin and penicillin to modulate lipopolysaccharide-induced cytokine production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Our results suggest that clindamycin affects protein synthesis in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. These data may, in part, explain why the efficacy of clindamycin is greater than that of penicillin and demonstrate that clindamycin may be important immune modulator.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app