Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Long-term follow-up and outcome of infants with non-organic failure to thrive.

Sixty-one children diagnosed as having non-organic failure to thrive during infancy were reviewed at an average of 5 years after their initial presentation, and were compared to a control group matched for age, sex, social class, and ethnic affiliation. Children with a previous history of failure to thrive were found to be shorter and, in particular, to gain less weight. Birthweight percentile and maternal height of children with failure to thrive were lower than those of matched children from the control group. They also had more learning difficulties and evidenced developmental delay. The degree of growth retardation and the duration of follow-up had no significant effect on the outcome. In contrast, birthweight, maternal height, and social status and, to a lesser extent, paternal parameters were good predictors of catching-up capabilities of these infants in terms of weight and height. Children who caught up faster had better school performances and came from families of higher socioeconomic status. Failure to thrive is a multifactorial process involving biological, nutritional, and environmental factors. All these components should be considered in long-term follow-up and management.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app