Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Immunohistochemical findings in jejunal specimens from patients with IgA deficiency.

Gut 1995 October
Jejunal biopsy specimens from 25 patients with IgA deficiency (IgAd) were studied immunohistochemically to find markers of inflammation. Five of the 25 patients had coeliac disease (CD): they were on a gluten free diet and had normal jejunal morphology. Only two of 15 specimens from control subjects had CD25+ cells in the surface epithelium, while this was seen in 19 out of 20 specimens from IgAd patients (p < 0.0001). A significant increase of CD25+ cells was also noted in the lamina propria of IgAd patients. The median percentage of crypt cells in mitosis (Ki67+ cells) was higher in the specimens from IgAd patients (26%) than in those from controls (13%, p < 0.001). The densities of gamma delta T cell receptor positive cells in the surface epithelium and lamina propria did not differ in the specimens from IgAd patients and those of controls nor was the expression of HLA class II antigens augmented in the surface epithelium. These findings were similar for the IgAd patients whether or not the patient had DQB 0201 allele, a genetic marker which is strongly associated with CD. The inadequacy of the local immunoglobulins in patients with IgAd may lead to increased T cell activation, which is accompanied by the appearance of intraepithelial CD25+ cells and with an increase in the mitotic rate in the crypts.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app