Clinical Trial
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Randomized Controlled Trial
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A multicenter randomized controlled trial of injections of sterile water and saline for chronic myofascial pain syndromes.

Pain 1995 June
A randomised controlled trial was used to test the hypothesis that cutaneous injections of sterile water (SWI) have no benefit over saline (PSI) as a method of pain reduction among patients with myofascial pain syndromes. Six general practitioners located at 6 different clinics of general practice treated 117 patients (91 female, 26 male, aged > or = 25 years) with myofascial pain syndrome for at least 3 months in one or both of the upper quadrants of the body. Patients were randomised to receive either SWI or PSI which was administered sub- and intracutaneously on 1 occasion. The patients received a mean number of 10 injections of 0.5 ml of either substance. The main outcome measure was pain intensity which was measured with visual analogue scales before intervention, 10 min after intervention and 14 days after intervention. We found no statistically or clinically significant difference in pain level reduction between the 2 groups. However, patients who received SWI reported a much more painful treatment experience than those who received PSI. Our study shows that injections of sterile water are substantially more painful but demonstrate no better clinical outcome than similar injections of saline as a method to treat patients with chronic myofascial pain syndrome.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app