CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Management of central nervous system infections during an epidemic of enteroviral aseptic meningitis.

Four hundred and fifty-six patients with signs and symptoms of potential central nervous system infection were evaluated from June 28, 1978, to September 30, 1978. The majority of the children had a relatively brief and mild illness characterized by a constellation of features previously described with central nervous system infections. Fever, headache, and vomiting were typical. Altered sensorium and nuchal rigidity were inconstant. One distinct and another infrequently reported feature of enteroviral disease, hypoglycorrhachia and cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis in excess of 2,000 cells/mm3, occurred independently or in concert in 18% of the cases. When these unexpected findings were associated with a presumptive clinical diagnosis of aseptic meningitis, watchful observation and repeat lumbar puncture precluded the necessity to administer antibiotics in every case. The possibility of enteroviral aseptic meningitis being a definitive diagnostic entity manageable on a group, yet individual basis utilizing a disposition protocol is discussed.

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