COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
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Poststreptococcal crescenteric glomerulonephritis in children: comparison of quintuple therapy versus supportive care.

Crescenteric glomerulonephritis preceded by a streptococcal infection with creatinine clearance CCr of less than 30 ml/minute/1.73 m2 was treated by supportive care plus three months of quintuple therapy (prednisone, azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, dipyridamole, and heparin followed by warfarin) in five children (Group A) or by supportive care alone in five others (Group B). Of the glomeruli examined, 69.8 +/- 11.7% (mean +/- SE) in Group A and 64.4 +/- 10.6% in Group B had crescents which involved 54.0 +/- 10.8% and 60.0 +/- 10.5% of glomerular circumference, respectively. Clinical and histologic findings supported a recent streptococcal infection in every patient. Two patients from Group A had mild proteinuria and normal CCr at 12 months; one died abruptly of pulmonary hemorrhage after maintaining a normal CCr for 25 months. Following a second episode of poststreptococcal acute glomerulonephritis seven months after the first, one patient from Group B had persistent mild proteinuria for 41 months and hypertension through 56 months of follow-up. Nine surviving patients have maintained normal CCr for eight to 60 months (mean 29.5 months). The findings of this study suggest that this quintuple therapy offers no advantage over supportive care in the clinical management and outcome of children with severe crescenteric glomerulonephritis when an antecedent streptococcal infection is confirmed by serologic and histopathologic criteria.

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