Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Blood-brain barrier derangement in uremic encephalopathy.

Surgery 1982 July
A disturbance of cerebral neurotransmitters and an accumulation of octopamine, a putative false neurotransmitter, have been found in patients with uremic encephalopathy who manifest disorientation, somnolence, asterixis, and coma--symptoms also seen in portal systemic encephalopathy (PSE). Altered plasma concentrations of the neutral amino acids (NAAs) and increased blood-brain NAA transport may play a role in PSE, and in the present study plasma amino acid concentrations and blood-brain barrier NAA transport were investigated in rats with acute and chronic uremia. Acute uremia was produced by unilateral nephrectomy and occlusion of the renal artery of the remaining kidney for 70 minutes; the animals were studied 24 hours later. Chronic uremia was produced by unilateral nephrectomy and 70% to 80% devascularization of the remaining kidney; these animals were studied 2 weeks later. Brain uptake was studied with the technique of Oldendorf, and blood and brain amino acids (AAs) were measured. The blood urea nitrogen (BUN) level in rats with acute uremia increased to 108 mg/dl, in rats with chronic uremic 54 mg/dl, and in sham-operated rats 22 mg/dl. In both uremic groups there was a decrease in plasma branched-chain AAs. In the brain these AA levels were normal, while levels of phenylalanine, tyrosine, and histidine were increased in uremic rats.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app