CASE REPORTS
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
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Respiratory function after paralysis of the right hemidiaphragm.

We studied a 45-yr-old man with normal lung function before and 7 wk after right phrenic nerve crush. Total lung capacity, functional residual capacity, and forced vital capacity decreased with residual volume remaining unchanged. Static compliance was also unchanged. Ventilatory response to CO2 (delta Ve/delta PaCO2) was preserved, but P0.1 response to CO2 (delta P0.1/delta PaCO2) increased. Analysis of raw mouth pressure suggested that these responses were the result of a new rapid pattern of inspiratory pressure development. Regional washout was slowed on the side with paralysis, but the normal apex-to-base gradient of regional volumes was preserved. Inhaled 133Xe boluses were distributed away from the side of paralysis, and bolus distribution changed relatively little with increased flow. These results suggested that in compensation for paralysis of a hemidiaphragm, a new pattern of inspiratory muscle recruitment developed, involving more rapid contraction of the remaining muscles of inspiration.

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