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Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S.
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Coverage of the infected wound.

Annals of Surgery 1983 October
Fifty-four consecutive patients with chronic wounds were identified by the following criteria: (1) established infection for 6 months, (2) exposure of bone, mediastinum, or other vital structure, (3) mechanical and/or vascular limitations to delayed closure techniques, (4) no response to wound debridement in prolonged antibiotic therapy. These wounds were divided into four groups: osteomyelitis (21), pressure sore (17), soft tissue wound (10), and osteoradionecrosis (6). Wound treatment in all patients included debridement, muscle flap closure, and culture specific antibiotic therapy. These consecutively treated patients over a 4-year period presented with an average duration of chronic infection of 2.9 years. Ninety-three per cent of these patients after treatment have demonstrated stable coverage without recurrent infection with a minimum of 1 year and a maximum of 4.6 years follow-up. The results demonstrate safe, effective coverage (93% of patients) of chronic infected wounds associated with long bone and pelvic osteomyelitis as well as chronic perineal sinuses following proctocolectomy and osteoradionecrosis. Debridement with short-term (average 12 days) antibiotic therapy has been effective when muscle flap coverage is provided.

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