COMPARATIVE STUDY
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
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Comparison of pharmacodynamic properties of various estrogen formulations.

A group of 23 healthy postmenopausal women received one or more 2-week courses of daily administration of the following estrogen preparations: piperazine estrone sulfate (Ogen), 0.3, 0.625, 1.25, 2.5, and 5.0 mg; micronized estradiol (Estrace), 1, 2, and 10 mg; conjugated estrogens (Premarin), 0.3, 0.625, 1.25, and 2.5 mg; ethinyl estradiol (Estinyl), 10 and 20 micrograms; and diethylstilbestrol, 0.1 and 0.5 mg. Each dosage of each formulation was ingested by three women. In those women who received more than one dosage, each course was separated by a drug-free interval of at least 4 weeks. Pretreatment and posttreatment levels of follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), corticosteroid-binding globulin-binding capacity, sex hormone-binding globulin-binding capacity, angiotensinogen, estrone, and estradiol were determined. The relative potency of these five estrogen formulations was determined by parallel line analysis for each of these responses, except LH. On a weight basis, piperazine estrone sulfate and micronized estradiol were equipotent for all responses. Conjugated estrogens suppressed FSH in a fashion equipotent to that of the other nonsynthetic estrogens; however, for all three hepatic parameters, the response was exaggerated twofold to threefold. The synthetic estrogens, diethylstilbestrol and ethinyl estradiol, were relatively more potent on a weight basis for every response and produced the most marked response (fourfold to eighteenfold in excess of their FSH suppression) for the hepatic parameters.

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