Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Chronic subdural haematoma.

A retrospective case note survey of chronic subdural haematomata was carried out in an attempt to throw some light on the difficulties encountered in clinical diagnosis. The combination of raised intracranial pressure headache, fluctuating drowsiness and mild hemiparesis, although highly suggestive of subdural haematoma, is not always encountered, and epilepsy, aphasia, hemianopia and dense hemiplegia can all occur contrary to 'text book' descriptions. Head injury or other aetiological factors are commonly absent. The presentation may mimic tumour, dementia, cerebrovascular accident or subarachnoid haemorrhage. Non-invasive investigations may yield false negative results, although in the case of radionucleide scanning and computerized axial tomography the reliability is approaching 90 per cent. The diagnosis will, however, remain an unexpected finding at angiography in a percentage of cases.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app