Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
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Epidemiology of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia.

Pediatrics 1985 April
Interview and record review data from 12,023 singleton deliveries were analyzed to determine the relationships between neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (10 mg/dL or greater) and maternal characteristics. Confounding variables were controlled by multiple logistic regression analysis. There was a statistically significant positive relationship between hyperbilirubinemia and low birth weight, Oriental race, premature rupture of membranes, breast-feeding, neonatal infection, use of the "pill" at time of conception, instrumental delivery, and history of first trimester bleeding. Maternal smoking and black race were negatively related to hyperbilirubinemia and statistically significant. In this study, other previously suspected etiologic factors such as epidural anesthesia, parity, use of oxytocin in labor, and white race were not associated with hyperbilirubinemia.

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