CLINICAL TRIAL
CONTROLLED CLINICAL TRIAL
JOURNAL ARTICLE
RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
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Topical nitroglycerin ointment in Raynaud's phenomenon.

The purpose of the study was to evaluate the hemodynamics of nitroglycerin ointment in Raynaud's phenomenon. 22 patients (15 women and 7 men aged 25-75 years) suffering from Raynaud's phenomenon were investigated in a double-blind paradigm. Blood flow measurements were performed by venous occlusion plethysmography. Cardiac output was registered by means of impedance cardiography. 800 mg nitroglycerin ointment 2% was applied on one hand only. In the placebo group, finger blood flow, blood pressure, heart rate, and cardiac output did not change significantly. In the group receiving nitroglycerin, finger blood flow increased significantly from 21.6 +/- 6.0 to 31.7 +/- 7.0 ml/100 ml/min. Systolic blood pressure decreased from 126 +/- 4 to 118 +/- 3 mmHg. Cardiac output significantly decreased from 7.3 +/- 0.8 to 6.3 +/- 0.5 l/min. It is concluded that nitroglycerin ointment in Raynaud's phenomenon has a local and a systemic effect as well, because, on the one hand, cardiac output and blood pressure decreased whereas, on the other hand, the increase in finger blood flow was more marked in the treated hand than in the contralateral control fingers.

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