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Synergistic N/Mn Codoping Deagglomerate Carbon Coating of LiFePO 4 /C To Boost Electrochemical Performance.

LiFePO4 is widely used because of its high safety and cycle stability, but its inefficient electronic conductivity combined with sluggish Li+ diffusivity restricts its performance. To overcome this obstacle, applying a layer of conductive carbon onto the surface of LiFePO4 has the greatest improvement in electronic conductivity and Li+ diffusivity. However, the rate performance of carbon-coated LiFePO4 makes it difficult to meet the application requirements. Although nitrogen doping improves electrochemical performance by providing active sites and electronic conductivity, the N-doped carbon coating is prone to agglomeration, which causes a sharp decrease in capacity when the current rate increases. In this work, a synergistic N, Mn codoping strategy is implemented to overcome the aforementioned drawbacks by disrupting the large agglomeration of C-N bonds, improving the uniformity of the surface coating layer to enhance the completeness of the conductive network and increasing the number of Li+ diffusion channels, and thus accelerating the mass transfer rate under high-rate current. Consequently, this strategy effectively improves the rate capability (119 mA h g-1 at 10 C) while maintaining excellent cycling performance (88% capacity retention over 600 cycles at 5 C). This work improves the rate of ion diffusion and the rate capability of micrometer-sized LiFePO4 , thus, enabling its wider application.

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