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Infective Endocarditis Due to High-Level Gentamicin-Resistant Enterococcus faecalis Complicated Multisystemic Complications in an Elderly Patient.

The escalating incidence of infective endocarditis (IE) caused by aminoglycoside-resistant Enterococcus is a growing concern for clinicians. This issue is particularly pronounced in elderly patients, who face an elevated risk of renal damage during antibiotic treatment, thereby limiting available pharmacological options. Furthermore, elderly patients often present with multiple comorbidities, leading to heightened mortality rates. In this article, we present a case involving an elderly male patient who sought medical attention on two separate occasions due to inflammation of the lower extremities and lumbosacral pain. Subsequent diagnosis revealed infective endocarditis (IE) caused by high-level gentamicin-resistant Enterococcus faecalis through blood culture and echocardiography. The patient also experienced peripheral and cerebral arterial embolism, secondary spine infection, and subsequent heart failure, highlighting the severity of the clinical situation. Following an initial 10-day course of vancomycin and ceftriaxone therapy, the patient developed renal impairment, necessitating a switch to bactericidal therapy with ampicillin in combination with ceftriaxone. Additionally, aortic valve replacement was performed during this period. Ultimately, the patient achieved clinical remission. This case underscores the critical importance of prompt and accurate diagnosis, appropriate antibiotic selection, and timely surgical intervention in enhancing the prognosis of elderly patients with IE.

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