Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Genetics of suicide ideation. A role for inflammation and neuroplasticity?

Suicide is a leading cause of death worldwide. Suicide ideation (SI) is a known risk factor for suicide behaviour (SB). The current psychobiology and genetic predisposition to SI and SB are poorly defined. Despite convincing relevance of a genetic background for SI, there is no current implementable knowledge about the genetic makeup that identifies subjects at risk for it. One of the possible reasons for the absence of a clear-cut evidence is the polygenetic nature of SI along with the very large sample sizes that are needed to observe significant genetic association result. The CATIE sample was instrumental to the analysis. SI was retrieved as measured by the Calgary test. Clinical possible covariates were identified by a nested regression model. A principal component analysis helped in defining the possible genetic stratification factors. A GWAS analysis, polygenic risk score associated with a random forest analysis and a molecular pathway analysis were undertaken to identify the genetic contribution to SI. As a result, 741 Schizophrenic individuals from the CATIE were available for the genetic analysis, including 166,325 SNPs after quality control and pruning. No GWAS significant result was found. The random forest analysis conducted by combining the polygenic risk score and several clinical variables resulted in a possibly overfitting model (OOB error rate < 1%). The molecular pathway analysis revealed several molecular pathways possibly involved in SI, of which those involved in microglia functioning were of particular interest. A medium-small sample of SKZ individuals was analyzed to shed a light on the genetic of SI. As an expected result from the underpowered sample, no GWAS positive result was retrieved, but the molecular pathway analysis indicated a possible role of microglia and neurodevelopment in SI.

Full text links

We have located open access text paper links.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app