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Serum 25(OH)D and vitamin K 1 levels in patients with severe motor and intellectual disability: A Japanese single-center experience.

Brain & Development 2024 June 14
PURPOSE: To investigate whether patients with severe motor and intellectual disability (SMID) have nutritional vitamin D and K insufficiencies and clarify the required vitamin supplementation.

METHODS: This prospective observational study enrolled Japanese adults with SMID receiving institutionalized care who underwent blood sampling between February 2020 and February 2022 during annual medical checkups. Serum vitamin K1 and 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OH)D) levels were measured to determine their relationship with serum uncarboxylated osteocalcin (ucOC) levels. Vitamin D and K intake was compared among tube-fed and oral-intake patients with SMID and control participants using corresponding serum levels.

RESULTS: The study included 124 patients with SMID (56 men and 68 women; mean age: 53.0 years) and 20 control participants. Serum 25(OH)D levels were significantly higher in the SMID group than in the control group and the oral intake SMID group than in the tube-fed SMID group. In the tube-fed SMID group, vitamin D intake was lower than the daily recommended intake and correlated with serum 25(OH)D levels. Daily vitamin K intake in the tube-fed group was lower than recommended but not correlated with serum vitamin K levels. Serum ucOC levels were significantly higher in the SMID group than in the control group. Tube feeding was significantly and positively correlated with serum 25(OH)D levels. Serum 25(OH)D levels were not correlated with serum vitamin K1 levels.

CONCLUSIONS: The SMID group had higher ucOC levels than the control group, possibly owing to daily vitamin K and D deficiencies. Vitamin D supplementation is recommended to decrease ucOC levels.

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