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Decoding the Implications of Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Receptor Agonists on Accelerated Facial and Skin Aging.

Following the advent of glucagon-like peptide-1 receptor agonists (GLP1RA), subsequent unintended effects such as accelerated facial aging and altered skin health have been noted. This review delves deeper into the causative underlying mechanisms and provides insights into the intricate relationship between GLP-1RA, adipose tissue, and premature facial aging, thereby highlighting the need for a nuanced understanding of their effects on facial alterations and skin health. Studies exploring the potential effects of GLP-1RA on facial alterations and offering insights into the possible underlying mechanisms, causes and clinical implications were included. The accelerated facial aging and altered skin health observed in GLP-1RA patients appears to be multifactorial, involving loss of dermal and subcutaneous white adipose tissue, altered proliferation and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), and impacts on the production and secretion of hormonal and metabolic factors. These changes compromise the structural integrity and barrier function of the skin and may lead to diminished facial muscle mass, further exacerbating the appearance of aging. The insights presented call for a paradigm shift in the clinical management of facial changes induced by GLP-1RA, with a focus on treatment strategies aimed at targeting ADSC stimulation. These include autologous fat transfers to reintroduce cells rich in ADSCs for rejuvenation, composite fat grafting combining autologous fat with/without stromal vascular fraction, and the strategic use of soft tissue fillers for volume restoration and biostimulation. This review highlights the potential role of GLP-1RA in modulating adipose tissue dynamics, contributing to accelerated aging through metabolic, structural, and hormonal pathways.

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