Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Clinical Pharmacogenetics Implementation Consortium Guideline for CYP2B6 Genotype and Methadone Therapy.

Methadone is a mu (μ) opioid receptor agonist used clinically in adults and children to manage opioid use disorder, neonatal abstinence syndrome, and acute and chronic pain. It is typically marketed as a racemic mixture of R- and S-enantiomers. R-methadone has 30-to 50-fold higher analgesic potency than S-methadone, and S-methadone has a greater adverse effect (prolongation) on the cardiac QTc interval. Methadone undergoes stereoselective metabolism. CYP2B6 is the primary enzyme responsible for catalyzing the metabolism of both enantiomers to the inactive metabolites, S- and R-2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (S- and R-EDDP). Genetic variation in the CYP2B6 gene has been investigated in the context of implications for methadone pharmacokinetics, dose, and clinical outcomes. Most CYP2B6 variants result in diminished or loss of CYP2B6 enzyme activity, which can lead to higher plasma methadone concentrations (affecting S- more than R-methadone). However, the data do not consistently indicate that CYP2B6-based metabolic variability has a clinically significant effect on methadone dose, efficacy, or QTc prolongation. Expert analysis of the published literature does not support a change from standard methadone prescribing based on CYP2B6 genotype (updates at www.cpicpgx.org).

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app