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Interaction of childhood trauma with BDNF and FKBP5 gene polymorphisms in predicting burnout in general occupational groups.

Both the BDNF gene rs6265 and the FKBP5 gene rs1360780 polymorphisms are independently associated with adult psychotic-like experiences, when exposed to high childhood abuse; however, it remains unclear whether the relationship between childhood abuse and burnout is moderated by these two single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Furthermore, there is an interaction between glucocorticoid receptor transcriptional activity and BDNF signaling. Therefore, we investigated the interaction of these two SNPs with childhood trauma in predicting burnout. We recruited 990 participants (mean age 33.06 years, S.D. = 6.31) from general occupational groups and genotyped them for rs6265 and rs1360780. Burnout, childhood trauma, resilience, and job stress were measured through a series of rating scales. Gene-by-environment and gene-by-gene-by-environment interactions were examined using linear hierarchical regression and PROCESS macro in SPSS. Covariates included demographics and resilience. We found that rs6265 moderated the association between job stress and emotional exhaustion. Both rs6265 and rs1360780 moderated the association between childhood abuse and cynicism. There was significant interaction of childhood abuse × rs6265 × rs1360780 on emotional exhaustion and reduced personal accomplishment, so that rs6265 CC genotype and rs1360780 TT genotype together predicted higher levels of emotional exhaustion under high childhood abuse, while rs6265 TT genotype and rs1360780 CC genotype together exerted a resilient effect on reduced personal accomplishment in the face of childhood abuse. Our findings suggest that the rs6265 CC genotype and rs1360780 TT genotype may jointly contribute to increased risk of burnout under childhood trauma.

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