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The carrier function and inhibition effect on benign prostatic hyperplasia of a glucan from Epimedium brevicornu Maxim.

Carbohydrate Polymers 2024 September 16
Epimedium, a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used as a dietary supplement, contains polysaccharides and flavonoids as its main bioactive ingredients. In this study, a neutral homogeneous polysaccharide (EPSN-1) was isolated from Epimedium brevicornu Maxim. EPSN-1 was identified as a glucan with a backbone of →4)-α-D-Glcp-(1→, branched units comprised α-D-Glcp-(1→6)-α-D-Glcp-(1→, β-D-Glcp-(1→6)-β-D-Glcp-(1→ and α-D-Glcp-(1→ connected to the C6 position of backbone. The conformation of EPSN-1 in aqueous solution indicated its potential to form nanoparticles. This paper aims to investigate the carrier and pharmacodynamic activity of EPSN-1. The findings demonstrated that, on the one hand, EPSN-1, as a functional ingredient, may load Icariin (ICA) through non-covalent interactions, improving its biopharmaceutical properties such as solubility and stability, thereby improving its intestinal absorption. Additionally, as an effective ingredient, EPSN-1 could help maintain the balance of the intestinal environment by increasing the abundance of Parabacteroides, Lachnospiraceae UGG-001, Anaeroplasma, and Eubacterium xylanophilum group, while decreasing the abundance of Allobaculum, Blautia, and Adlercreutzia. Overall, this dual action of EPSN-1 sheds light on the potential applications of natural polysaccharides, highlighting their dual role as carriers and contributors to biological activity.

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