Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Types of Short-Duration Electrical Stimulation-Induced Efficiency in the Axonal Regeneration and Recovery: Comparative in Vivo Study in Rat Model of Repaired Sciatic Nerve and its Tibial Branch after Transection Injury.

The restoration of adequate function and sensation in nerves following an injury is often insufficient. Electrical stimulation (ES) applied during nerve repair can promote axon regeneration, which may enhance the likelihood of successful functional recovery. However, increasing operation time and complexity are associated with limited clinical use of ES. This study aims to better assess whether short-duration ES types (voltage mode vs. current mode) are able to produce enhanced regenerative activity following peripheral nerve repair in rat models. Wistar rats were randomly divided into 3 groups: no ES (control), 30-minute ES with a current pulse, and 30-minute ES with a voltage pulse. All groups underwent sciatic nerve transection and repair using a silicone tube to bridge the 6-mm gap between the stumps. In the 2 groups other than the control, ES was applied after the surgical repair. Outcomes were evaluated using electrophysiology, histology, and serial walking track analysis. Biweekly walking tracks test over 12 weeks revealed that subjects that underwent ES experienced more rapid functional improvement than subjects that underwent repair alone. Electrophysiological analysis of the newly intratubular sciatic nerve at week 12 revealed strong motor function recovery in rats that underwent 30-minute ES. Histologic analysis of the sciatic nerve and its tibial branch at 12 weeks demonstrated robust axon regrowth in all groups. Both types of short-duration ES applied during nerve repair can promote axon regrowth and enhance the chances of successful functional recovery.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app