Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Breast cancer after ovarian cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 pathogenic variant heterozygotes: lower rates for 5-years post chemotherapy.

BACKGROUND: The identification of germline BRCA1/BRCA2 pathogenic variants (PV) infer high remaining lifetime breast/ovarian cancer risks, but there is paucity of studies assessing breast cancer risk after ovarian cancer diagnosis.

METHODS: We reviewed the history of breast cancer in 895 PV heterozygotes (BRCA1=541). Cumulative annual breast cancer incidence was assessed at 2,5,10 and >10 years following ovarian cancer diagnosis date.

RESULTS: Breast cancer annual rates were evaluated in 701 assessable women with no breast cancer at ovarian diagnosis (BRCA1=425). Incidence was lower at 2years (1.18%) and 2-5years (1.13%), but rose thereafter for BRCA1 with incidence post 10years in excess of 4% annually. Breast cancer pathology in BRCA1 PV heterozygotes showed less high-grade triple negative breast cancer and more lower grade hormone-receptor positive cancer than women with no prior ovarian cancer. In the prospective cohort from ovarian cancer diagnosis <4% of all deaths were caused by breast cancer, although 50% of deaths in women with breast cancer post-ovarian cancer diagnosis were due to breast cancer.

CONCLUSION: Women can be reassured that incidence of breast cancer post-ovarian diagnosis is relatively low. It appears likely that this effect is due to platinum-based chemotherapy. Nonetheless women need to be aware that incidence increases thereafter, especially after 10 years.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app