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Experiences and Attitudes Toward Telemedicine in an Adult Congenital Heart Disease Clinic: Lessons Learned from the COVID-19 Pandemic.

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has driven a broader adoption of telemedicine (TM). We aim to describe adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) patient experiences with TM and explore factors associated with positive attitude toward future TM visits. This is a cross-sectional, single-center study in an outpatient ACHD clinic from February to June, 2022. Between-group comparisons were made using Wilcoxon-Rank Sum, Chi-Square, or Fisher-Exact tests. Univariate logistic regression was performed for variables that could correlate with a "positive" attitude toward future TM visits. Significance was determined using an alpha level of 0.05. Of 262 patients (median age 33 years, 55% female, 81% White), 115 (44%) had a prior TM visit and 110 (96%) reported a positive experience. There were 64 (24%) with a positive attitude toward future TM visits. Concerns include lack of cardiac testing and limited quality of visit. Patients with visits every 3-6 months (Odds Ratio [OR] 2.44; p < 0.01) and prior TM visit (OR 1.89; p = 0.03) had higher odds of a positive attitude toward future TM, whereas males had lower odds (OR 0.53; p = 0.04). Age, annual income, disease complexity, distance from clinic, and employment status were not associated. There is high rate of satisfaction with TM among ACHD patients but only one-quarter indicated interest in using TM in the future. Factors associated with interest in TM visits are identified, and together with patient feedback, can be used to understand potential role of TM for the ACHD population in the post-pandemic era.

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