Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Genetic background strongly influences the impact of carrying the Thr92Ala-DIO2 polymorphism in the male mouse.

Endocrinology 2024 June 6
About half of the world population carries at least one allele of the Ala92-DIO2, which slows down the activity of the type 2 deiodinase (D2), the enzyme that activates T4 to T3. Carrying the Ala92-DIO2 allele has been associated with increased BMI and insulin resistance, but this has not been reproduced in all populations. To test if the genetic background affects the impact of this polymorphism, here we studied the genetically distant C57Bl/6J (B6) and FVB/N (FVB) mice carrying the Ala92-Dio2 allele as compared to control mice carrying the Thr92-Dio2 allele. Whereas B6-Ala92-Dio2 and B6-Thr92-Dio2 mice⸺fed chow or high fat diet⸺behaved metabolically similar in studies using indirect calorimetry, glucose- and insulin-tolerance tests, and measuring white adipose tissue (WAT) weight and liver steatosis, major differences were observed between FVB-Ala92-Dio2 and FVB-Thr92-Dio2 mice. Carrying the Ala92-Dio2 allele (on a chow diet) resulted in hypercholesterolemia, smaller WAT pads, hepatomegaly, steatosis, and transcriptome changes in the interscapular brown adipose tissue (iBAT) typical of ER stress and apoptosis. Acclimatization at thermoneutrality (30°C) eliminated most of the metabolic phenotype, indicating that impaired adaptive (BAT) thermogenesis can be involved. In conclusion, the metabolic impact of carrying the Ala92-Dio2 allele depends greatly on the genetic background of the mouse, varying from no phenotype in B6 mice to a major phenotype in FVB mice. These results will help the planning of future clinical trials studying the Thr92Ala-DIO2 polymorphism and may explain why some of the clinical studies performed in different populations across the globe have obtained inconsistent results.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app