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Neuroprotective and Neurite Outgrowth Stimulating Effects of New Low-Basicity 5-HT 7 Receptor Agonists: In Vitro Study in Human Neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y Cells.

There is some evidence that the serotonin receptor subtype 7 (5-HT7 ) could be new therapeutic target for neuroprotection. The aim of this study was to compare the neuroprotective and neurite outgrowth potential of new 5-HT7 receptor agonists (AH-494, AGH-238, AGH-194) with 5-CT (5-carboxyamidotryptamine) in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. The results revealed that 5-HT7 mRNA expression was significantly higher in retinoic acid (RA)-differentiated cells when compared to undifferentiated ones and it was higher in cell cultured in neuroblastoma experimental medium (DMEM) compared to those placed in neuronal (NB) medium. Furthermore, the safety profile of compounds was favorable for all tested compounds at concentration used for neuroprotection evaluation (up to 1 μM), whereas at higher concentrations (above 10 μM) the one of the tested compounds, AGH-194 appeared to be cytotoxic. While we observed relatively modest protective effects of 5-CT and AH-494 in UN-SH-SY5Y cells cultured in DMEM, in UN-SH-SY5Y cells cultured in NB medium we found a significant reduction of H2 O2 -evoked cell damage by all tested 5-HT7 agonists. However, 5-HT7 -mediated neuroprotection was not associated with inhibition of caspase-3 activity and was not observed in RA-SH-SY5Y cells exposed to H2 O2 . Furthermore, none of the tested 5-HT7 agonists altered the damage induced by 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA), 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP +) and doxorubicin (Dox) in UN- and RA-SH-SY5Y cells cultured in NB. Finally we showed a stimulating effect of AH-494 and AGH-194 on neurite outgrowth. The obtained results provide insight into neuroprotective and neurite outgrowth potential of new 5-HT7 agonists.

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