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Sunscreen Practices and Preferences of Skin of Color Patients.

Sunscreen is an essential way to protect against photodamage from ultraviolet (UV) radiation. Despite the recognized benefits of sunscreen in preventing skin damage from UV light, its use varies across different patient groups. This cross-sectional, questionnaire-based study aims to uncover the sunscreen usage patterns, preferences, and barriers among non-Hispanic White (NHW) and skin of color (SOC) individuals. Our findings demonstrate that NHW individuals are more likely to wear sunscreen daily (31% NHW vs 25% SOC) and reapply sunscreen at least once a day (76% NHW vs 45% SOC) compared with SOC individuals. SOC individuals demonstrate a willingness to use sunscreen, but they face barriers such as cost (2% NHW vs 16% SOC), lack of knowledge in finding suitable products (22% NHW vs 41% SOC), and concerns about white cast (7% NHW vs 25% SOC). SOC individuals are less likely to know the difference between mineral and chemical sunscreen (49% NHW vs 29% SOC), less likely to learn about sunscreen from dermatologists (36% NHW vs 22% SOC), and more likely to prefer sunscreen from brands owned by people of color (13% NHW vs 47% SOC).  In addition to analyzing the broader categories of NHW and SOC, subgroup analysis was conducted on specific subgroups, including Black, Asian, and Hispanic groups. Herein, we highlight differences in motivations, sunscreen preferences, sources of information, and knowledge levels about sun protection between NHW and SOC individuals. By uncovering the unique needs and challenges faced by SOC individuals, we aim to improve culturally competent patient education and promote effective sun protection practices across diverse populations. J Drugs Dermatol. 2024;23(6):456-462.     doi:10.36849/JDD.8268.

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