Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

A Comparison of Clinical Outcomes of Colectomies for Pediatric and Adult Patients With Inflammatory Bowel Disease.

American Surgeon 2024 June 4
Background: Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are prevalent in adult and pediatric populations, but their differences are not well studied using national data. We compared the clinical outcomes of these patients using the American College of Surgeons (ACS) National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) databases. Methods: Colectomy cases for CD and UC, the 2 major forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), were compared between adult and pediatric patients using the 2017-2019 ACS NSQIP databases. Various clinical factors were analyzed, with postoperative complications being the primary outcome of interest. Results: We identified 542 pediatric and 5174 adult CD patients and 360 pediatric and 1292 adult UC patients. Adults with CD or UC were more likely to be on steroids preoperatively (CD: 60.15% vs 24.54%; UC: 65.63% vs 51.39%). Children with IBD were more likely to have preoperative transfusions (CD: 1.48% vs .33%; UC: 8.33% vs .62%), systemic inflammatory response syndrome (CD: 3.51% vs .93%; UC: 12.78% vs 3.10%), or sepsis (CD: 1.85% vs .66%; UC: 1.39% vs .31%). Unplanned reoperations were more common among pediatric patients in both disease states compared to adults (CD: 6.27% vs 4.10%; UC: 11.11% vs 4.26%), with P -values for all factors described as ≤.02. Multivariate logistic regression found pediatric age to be associated with higher odds of needing a reoperation among UC patients but not CD patients. Conclusion: Pediatric patients were sicker at the time of surgery, and those with either disease were more likely to require a reoperation within 30 days.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app