Journal Article
Review
Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Reviewing the impact of hydroxyurea on DNA methylation and its potential clinical implications in sickle cell disease.

Hydroxyurea (HU) is the most common drug therapy for sickle cell disease (SCD). The clinical benefits of HU derive from its upregulation of fetal hemoglobin (HbF), which reduces aggregation of the mutated sickle hemoglobin protein (HbS) and reduces SCD symptoms and complications. However, some individuals do not respond to HU, or stop responding over time. Unfortunately, current understanding of the mechanism of action of HU is limited, hindering the ability of clinicians to identify those patients who will respond to HU and to optimize treatment for those receiving HU. Given that epigenetic modifications are essential to erythropoiesis and HbF expression, we hypothesize that some effects of HU may be mediated by epigenetic modifications, specifically DNA methylation. However, few studies have investigated this possibility and the effects of HU on DNA methylation remain relatively understudied. In this review, we discuss the evidence linking HU treatment to DNA methylation changes and associated gene expression changes, with an emphasis on studies that were performed in individuals with SCD. Overall, although HU can affect DNA methylation, research on these changes and their clinical effects remains limited. Further study is likely to contribute to our understanding of hematopoiesis and benefit patients suffering from SCD.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app