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Anatomical Structures at Risk in Percutaneous Distal Bunionette Correction.

Bunionette deformity is an incredibly pervasive issue in our society with almost a quarter of individuals being affected by it. As it is so common, there are numerous techniques and approaches to correct the deformity. Currently, there is a growing trend that favors percutaneous osteotomy of the bunionette. As there are multiple osteotomy sites, there are anatomical considerations that must be made at each one. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomic structures at risk during distal osteotomy of bunionette deformity using a Shannon burr. Using 11 fresh cadaver specimens, the fifth metatarsal was accessed through a carefully marked portal. A Shannon burr was employed for the osteotomy. Dissections were performed to assess potential damage to critical structures, including the lateral dorsal cutaneous nerve (LDCN), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), and extensor digitorum longus (EDL). Measurements were taken from the osteotomy site to each structure. The distal osteotomy site was on average greater than 8 mm from the EDL and ADM, whereas it was 1.64 mm from the LDCN. The Shannon burr made contact with and transected the LDCN on 2 occasions. However, previous studies have highlighted potential anatomical variations of the LDCN that arise distally. The study underscored the challenges posed by minimally invasive approaches to treating bunionette deformity and highlighted the need for cautious consideration when using percutaneous methods. Level of Clinical Evidence: 5.

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