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Safety and effectiveness of remdesivir in hospitalized patients with COVID-19 and severe renal impairment: experience at a large medical center.

Annals of Medicine 2024 December
BACKGROUND: Literature on the safety of remdesivir in hospitalized COVID-19 patients with severe renal impairment is limited. We aimed to investigate the safety and effectiveness of remdesivir in this population.

METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of adult hospitalized COVID-19 patients who received remdesivir between April 2022 and October 2022. Outcomes were compared between estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) <30 mL/min/1.73 m2 and ≥30 mL/min/1.73 m2 groups. The primary safety outcomes were acute kidney injury (AKI) and bradycardia, while the primary effectiveness outcomes included mortality in COVID-19-dedicated wards and hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included laboratory changes, disease progression, and recovery time.

RESULTS: A total of 1,343 patients were recruited, with 307 (22.9%) in the eGFR <30 group and 1,036 (77.1%) in the eGFR ≥30 group. Patients with an eGFR <30 had higher risks of AKI (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] 2.92, 95% CI 1.93-4.44) and hospital mortality (aHR 1.47, 95% CI 1.06-2.05) but had comparable risks of bradycardia (aHR 1.15, 95% CI 0.85-1.56) and mortality in dedicated wards (aHR 1.43, 95% CI 0.90-2.28) than patients with an eGFR ≥30. Risk of disease progression was higher in the eGFR <30 group (adjusted odds ratio 1.62, 95% CI 1.16-2.26). No difference between the two groups in laboratory changes and recovery time.

CONCLUSIONS: Hospitalized COVID-19 patients receiving remdesivir with severe renal impairment had an increased risk of AKI, hospital mortality, and COVID-19 disease progression compared to patients without severe renal impairment.

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