Add like
Add dislike
Add to saved papers

Outcomes in Subfascial versus Subglandular Planes in Breast Augmentation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Breast augmentation is the most commonly performed aesthetic surgery procedure in women worldwide. The use of the subfascial plane has been suggested to decrease the incidence of capsular contracture compared to the subglandular plane, while simultaneously avoiding the complication of animation deformity in the subpectoral plane. The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to compare the adverse outcomes of subfascial compared to subglandular planes in breast augmentation. This review was registered a priori on OSF (https://osf.io/pm92e/). A search from inception to June 2023 was performed on Medline, Embase, and CENTRAL. A hand search was also performed. All randomized and comparative cohort studies were included that assessed the use of the subfascial plane for breast augmentation. Outcomes evaluated included the incidences of seroma, hematoma, infection, rippling, capsular contracture, and revision surgery. Ten studies were included in this systematic review. Three randomized controlled trials and seven comparative cohort studies were used for quantitative synthesis. There was a significant difference favoring subfascial compared to subglandular planes in the incidence of hematoma, rippling, and capsular contracture. All included studies had high risk of bias. The current evidence suggests that the subfascial plane for breast augmentation decreases risk of capsular contracture, hematoma, and rippling compared to the subglandular plane. Further randomized evidence with high methodological rigor is still required to validate these findings.

Full text links

We have located links that may give you full text access.
Can't access the paper?
Try logging in through your university/institutional subscription. For a smoother one-click institutional access experience, please use our mobile app.

Related Resources

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

Mobile app image

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app

All material on this website is protected by copyright, Copyright © 1994-2024 by WebMD LLC.
This website also contains material copyrighted by 3rd parties.

By using this service, you agree to our terms of use and privacy policy.

Your Privacy Choices Toggle icon

You can now claim free CME credits for this literature searchClaim now

Get seemless 1-tap access through your institution/university

For the best experience, use the Read mobile app