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Evaluation of ultrasound-guided PFO occlusion in the treatment of vestibular migraine.

BACKGROUND: Currently, surgery is the mainstay of the clinical treatment of vestibular migraine.

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the clinical efficacy and safety of using transesophageal echocardiography-guided interventional closure of the patent foramen ovale (PFO) in the treatment of vestibular migraine.

METHODS: The study included 52 patients with vestibular migraine who were admitted to our hospital between June 2019 and June 2021. All selected patients underwent a transesophageal echocardiography-guided interventional closure of the PFO and were followed up for one year after surgery. We observed the clinical efficacy and surgical success rate one year after surgery and compared the improvement in clinical symptoms and perioperative safety at different time points.

RESULTS: The overall remission rate and the surgical success rate for the 52 patients with vestibular migraine one year after surgery were 86.54% and 96.15%, respectively. Compared to the pre-surgery levels, there was a significant progressively decreasing trend in the scores on the Headache Impact Test-6 (HIT-6), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire, frequency of headaches, and duration of headaches in patients with vestibular migraine at 1, 3, and 6 months after surgery (P< 0.05). Among the 52 patients, one developed atrial fibrillation three hours after surgery, which then spontaneously converted to sinus rhythm, and none of the other patients had adverse outcomes such as hematoma at the puncture site during the perioperative period.

CONCLUSION: Transesophageal echocardiography-guided interventional closure of the PFO for treating vestibular migraine significantly improved the symptoms of migraine in patients, with a high surgical success rate, significant clinical efficacy, and favorable safety.

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